Coffee Mornings: What’s your morning routine?

In a COVID19 world, where many of us are working from home, finding a work life/balance can be challenging, especially for working parents. Establishing a morning routine, and setting boundaries with a work schedule can help alleviate some of the stress many of us are experiencing. What's a routine that has worked for you as an entrepreneur?

Women Founder Alum Series: Meet Zamani Ra

The Women Founder alum series aim to highlight stories of women entrepreneurs and startups who were/are part of the Women in Leadership/Women Founder program at Parkdale Centre for Innovation. We hear from the founders on where they’re currently at with their business, some of the successes and challenges they’re facing, life, and everything in between.

Women Founder Alum Series: Meet Gloria Blizzard

The Women Founder alum series aim to highlight stories of women entrepreneurs and startups who were/are part of the Women in Leadership/Women Founder program at Parkdale Centre for Innovation. We hear from the founders on where they're currently at with their business, some of the successes and challenges they're facing, life, and everything in between. … Continue reading Women Founder Alum Series: Meet Gloria Blizzard

3 Lessons I Learned as a Woman of Colour in Entrepreneurship

BIPOC women founders face economical and social barriers in addition to racial barriers when they start a business. Often times, we have to go through an added layer of dealing with this complexity as we handle day to day interactions, conversations, and relationships. Photo by Ümit Bulut on Unsplash Why wait till you learn the … Continue reading 3 Lessons I Learned as a Woman of Colour in Entrepreneurship

How a Chicago Lunch Program is Supporting Families During COVID19

My first time visiting Leyden High School was two summers ago, when I also visited Chicago for the first time. I was there to conduct an Equity and Inclusion workshop for staff and teachers, as part of their summer Professional Development. I was very inspired by the teachers and admin staff. Their dedication to make … Continue reading How a Chicago Lunch Program is Supporting Families During COVID19

Changing the Narrative: media, podcasting, storytelling. What’s your story?

When we think about access to media, news, radio, and broadcasting, we often think of white, heteronormative thoughts, ideologies and voices put together to formulate our society's collective voice. This is not representative of marginalized voices; voices who have fought and spoken up about equity, peace, justice, and democracy for centuries. Voices who have fought … Continue reading Changing the Narrative: media, podcasting, storytelling. What’s your story?

Workshop Notes: Telling Our Stories: Immigrant Women’s Resilience

Parkdale Community and Legal Services hosted a workshop that focuses on the experiences of immigrant women when it comes to their immigration status in Canada, as well as introducing a graphic novel written by immigrant women to support immigrant women when it comes to violence against women.  Here are several highlights from the workshop: What … Continue reading Workshop Notes: Telling Our Stories: Immigrant Women’s Resilience

Interview with Education Week: Blogging for English Language Learners

My interview with Larry Ferlazzo for Education Week: LF: You write about the concept of "communicative pedagogy."  Can you elaborate on it here and share some specific examples of what it might look like in the classroom? Rusul Alrubail: Communicative pedagogy is the practice in the classroom that centers the importance of interaction as one … Continue reading Interview with Education Week: Blogging for English Language Learners

#EduColor

Edit: the title of this post was changed from "why i left #Educolor" to just #educolor because we're all brothers and sisters and we're all growing and learning together. It's all love. I am writing this post in solidarity with my friend Melinda D. Anderson, who announced her resignation from Educolor this week. I am … Continue reading #EduColor

Book: Digital Writing for English Language Learners

Digital Writing for English Language learners looks at practical ways educators can implement the use of technology in their English and Language Arts classroom for English Language Learners. The book provides a variety of classroom activities and assignments that can be completed with English Language Learners using social media and other digital writing tools. The … Continue reading Book: Digital Writing for English Language Learners

Disruption in Education: It’s a good thing, and it’s more than a buzzword

This post was originally published in International Literacy Association's Literacy Today magazine.  Google defines disruption as a “disturbance or problems that interrupt an event, activity, or process”. We need to look at disruption as a concept to use and implement in education, not as a problem, but as a strategy to formulate solutions to current … Continue reading Disruption in Education: It’s a good thing, and it’s more than a buzzword

Meet @BlairImani the activist fighting for intersectionality and rights for those on the femme spectrum

This interview was published originally on The Tempest. Blair’s activism and presence on social media and in real life has been an inspiration to many women of color everywhere. I connected with social justice activist Blair Imani after we both tweeted using the hashtag #CanYouHearUsNow, which was created by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, after Donald … Continue reading Meet @BlairImani the activist fighting for intersectionality and rights for those on the femme spectrum

Social Justice Activism in the Digital Space

Twitter recently has added a new feature, where you can mute any account that doesn't have verified profile information, like a photo, phone number or email address. This feature is particularly helpful for activists on Twitter. If you've ever tweeted about social justice issues, GamerGate, Trump, or any other political issues, you'd likely have come … Continue reading Social Justice Activism in the Digital Space

Resources to Teach about The #MuslimBan

Many educators are often afraid of discussing "controversial" issues in the classroom. The word "controversial" here puts a shroud on many relevant topics, such as politics, daily events, history, social justice issues, equality, and many others. What are you so afraid of? Having a healthy debate in the classroom? shouldn't students be exposed to different … Continue reading Resources to Teach about The #MuslimBan

Planting a Seed – Our Project on the Refugee Crisis

Pernille’s class did a unit on the refugee crisis, and I was honoured to share my story with 3 of her classes. I love the process that she did to guide her students through the topic. By having students debate, discuss and ask questions about a topic that’s causing a great deal of discussion, outrage, and intolerance is so important to help students see and understand the urgency of the situation. Please have a read and I hope this Pernille’s lesson inspires you to start the conversation with your students.

Pernille Ripp

I grew up in a home that had a newspaper on our table every morning.  Laid out for us kids to see, we grabbed the comics first, then the Danish news.  I was a teen when I started reading the international news.  Being aware of the world was something that was expected of us, after all, Denmark is a small nation.  We read the paper, we listened to the radio, we watched the news.  Not always fully attuned but always aware of at least some of the bigger things happening in the world beyond our own.

Being a globally aware and invested teacher is something I have tried to live and breathe for many years now.  After all, the Global Read Aloud was created with the idea of making the world not only smaller, but also more interconnected to create more empathy and kindness.  My students have therefore in varying…

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“Find out why you feel that way and take a step back”

My interview with Rolland Chidiac, listen to it here: In this episode I chat with Rusul Alrubail. Rusul is an education writer, consultant, and blogger who is currently working on The Writing Project, a platform that fosters and nurtures student literacy and voice. Prior to her work with the Writing Project Rusul was a Professor at … Continue reading “Find out why you feel that way and take a step back”

Five Ways to Advocate for Justice in Education

This post was originally published on Teaching Tolerance.  “We live in a time of crisis,” warned Dr. Ruha Benjamin in the beginning of her opening keynote at the 2016 International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference. Benjamin, an assistant professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of People’s … Continue reading Five Ways to Advocate for Justice in Education

The Toughest Lessons Learned: Conversations on Race

“In a sense the limitations of Orientalism are, as I said earlier, the limitations that follow upon disregarding, essentializing, denuding the humanity of another culture, people, or geographical region.” ~ Edward Said The first time I read Edward Said's "Orientalism" was when I was doing my Master's in Literature, back in 2008. I remember signing … Continue reading The Toughest Lessons Learned: Conversations on Race